MoMA The Museum of Modern Art
@themuseumofmodernart

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The world's museum for modern and contemporary art. Discover artists and ideas that surprise, challenge, and inspire you.

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Medias

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
“In a painting, you should be able to discover new things each time you look at it...For me, a painting must give off sparks. It must dazzle like the beauty of a woman or a poem.” – #JoanMiró … Explore Miró’s unique visual language born out of his intense engagement with poetry, the creative process, material experimentation, and the seen and unseen world. “The Hunter (Catalan Landscape)” is now on view: mo.ma/joanmiro … [🎨 Details: Montroig, July 1923-winter 1924. Oil on canvas. Purchase. © 2019 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris] #JoanMiro

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
“The narrative arc Richter creates begins in a banally sweet portrait image of a young woman and ends in a collective ritual of public mourning. Yet both, Richter seems to suggest, are inadequate to our understanding of what has taken place. What truth, he seems to ask, do photographs offer? Can violence or righteousness be discerned in the blur of grays?” –Leah Dickerman ( @leah_dickerman), Director of Editorial and Content Strategy … #GerhardRichter debuted his 15-painting suite “October 18, 1977,” concerning the radical left-wing Baader-Meinhof Group that had shaken Germany with a two-year campaign of terror, a decade after his dealer feared the artist had left potent political topics behind. Now on view in #TheLongRunMoMA, learn more about this mysterious cycle of paintings, its power, and its significance in contemplating the dangers of ideology: mo.ma/october18 (link in bio) … [Credit: Gerhard Richter. "October 18, 1977" (detail). 1988. Oil on canvas, 15 panels, installation variables. The Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection, gift of Philip Johnson, and acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest (all by exchange); Enid A. Haupt Fund; Nina and Gordon Bunshaft Bequest Fund; and gift of Emily Rauh Pulitzer. © 2019 Gerhard Richter]

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
What inspired naval engineer Richard James, and his wife Betty, to turn an old spring into a global phenomenon? A brochure describes the origins of the popular toy: “Slinky was once just a little old everyday spring on a ship. One day Dick took it home to show his family. His little boy, Tommy, surprised everybody by making the spring walk down the stairs—all by itself! That gave Dick the idea to make this little old spring into a toy. His wife named it Slinky!” … Richard James spent a few years perfecting his design before bringing it to market in 1945. It was Betty who brought Slinky its international success, marketing the cleverly named toy with a catchy jingle and playful television ads. When she died in 2008, The New York Times estimated that the number of Slinkys sold since the 1940s could circle the globe 150 times. … Learn more about 10 of our favorite objects from #ValueofGoodDesign: mo.ma/gooddesignobjects (link in bio) … [Credit: Richard James, Betty James. Slinky. 1945. Steel, compressed. Manufacturer: James Spring & Wire Company; later James Industries; now Alex Brands, USA. Gift of the manufacturer]

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
Best known for cofounding New York City Ballet and the School of American Ballet with George Balanchine, Lincoln Kirstein (1907–1996), a writer, critic, curator, and tastemaker, was also a key figure in MoMA’s early history. Immerse yourself in this visionary impresario’s expansive, alternative view of modern art. Members see “Lincoln Kirstein’s Modern” first, March 13–16. Open to the public March 17: mo.ma/lincolnkirstein #LincolnKirstein

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
🔊 When French poet Jacques Prévert was asked about his friend, #JoanMiró, he answered with a poem. Avant-garde poetry served as a great source of inspiration for Miró to create his radiantly imaginative and highly inventive form of painting. Explore over 60 paintings, prints, books, and objects that shed new light on the development of his poetic process and pictorial universe: mo.ma/joanmiro #joanmiro

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
Explore work by German women cinematographers, hand-picked by Mariette Rissenbeek, the first woman to lead the Berlin Film Festival. #MoMAFilm kicks the series off this weekend with 5 discussions led by cinematographers and filmmakers. Reserve your seat for screenings March 1-12: mo.ma/rissenbeek … [“The Chambermaid Lynn.” 2014. Germany. Directed by Ingo Haeb. Cinematography by Sophie Maintigneux. Photo: Olaf Hirschberg]

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
#MoMADesignStore welcomes you to The Print Shop, a new online and in-store Pop-Up inspired by MoMA’s long history of collecting and producing posters, which began shortly after the Museum’s opening in 1929. Discover hard-to-find posters by artists in the Museum’s collection and a selection of limited-edition “FreshPrints!” from legendary Brooklyn-based screenprinters Kayrock. Visitors to @MoMADesignStore in Soho can also take advantage of Simply Framed’s superior framing design and service. Explore our collection of posters and prints: mo.ma/printshop

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
Celebrate the legacy of pioneering architect-designer Florence Knoll Bassett, who passed away on January 25, 2019, at the age of 101, and explore how her “total design” ethos helped reshape the look of corporate offices and midcentury homes with a pared-down, modernist sensibility—now on view on our 3rd floor with #ValueofGoodDesign. ... A student of modernist architects Eliel Saarinen and Mies van der Rohe, “Shu,” as she was known to friends, co-founded the boundary-breaking modern furnishings company Knoll Associates with her husband Hans Knoll in 1946, and became the guiding force behind its success, opening up an international market for modern home furnishings in the years after World War II. … [Photo: John Wronn]

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
Last spring, our #TarsilaMoMA exhibition explored the work of Tarsila do Amaral, a beloved trailblazer at the heart of the invention of modern art in Brazil. Today we welcome her work to #MoMACollection—”A Lua (The Moon)” (1928) is the first painting by Tarsila in the collection of a North American museum. 🇧🇷 … “Tarsila was really a border-crossing figure...the way in which she combined a vocabulary that spoke to a Brazilian...cultural background at the same time that it 100% talked about Picasso or Brancusi or Léger. Visually, stylistically, that feels so today to us,” says Ann Temkin ( @ann.temkin), Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture. Learn more about this landmark work, its journey to MoMA, and how it expands our understanding of history and its making: mo.ma/tarsilaalua (link in bio) … [Image: Tarsila do Amaral. “A Lua (The Moon).” 1928. Oil on canvas. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase]

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
Joel Robinson is the first black designer to enter MoMA’s design collection. His Ovals fabrics—of which there are three patterns—were first shown in the 1951 Good Design exhibition at the Chicago Merchandise Mart and here at MoMA. Lauded at the time for his “strikingly original designs,” he was featured in both Ebony and Jet magazines, two important publications dedicated to black culture. One article in the May 1952 issue of Ebony called Robinson “one of the most promising newcomers in the highly-competitive field of fabric design.” Robinson was by all accounts a talented artist, and his keen eye carried him through the ranks as a creative director at the little-known New York advertising firm David D. Polon, which specialized in packaging and other graphic design work. By 1954, he was promoted to Executive Vice President at the firm, but little else is know about him after that date. … Explore more iconic designs in #ValueofGoodDesign: mo.ma/gooddesign … [Credit: Joel Robinson. "Ovals textile." c. 1951–55. Screenprinted linen. Manufactured by L. Anton Maix Fabrics (New York, NY, est. 1948). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Architecture and Design Funds. Photo by Jonathan Muzikar © The Museum of Modern Art]

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
Ever wonder how MoMA cares for the over 30,000 photos in the Museum's collection? Join curator Sarah Meister ( @themomameister) and conservator Lee Ann Daffner in our Photo Conservation Studio for a Live Q&A this Wednesday, February 27 at 3:00 p.m. EST. ... Submit your questions in advance in the comments below, or ask them during Wednesday’s live broadcast at mo.ma/live

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art (@themuseumofmodernart) Instagram photo 2 months  ago

2 months ago
Explore radiant paintings by one of the 20th century’s most lyrical poet-painters. #JoanMiró is now on view through June 15: mo.ma/joanmiro